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The Art History of Technology: Translucent things, bad special effects, machine art, miniature everything, games, comics.

Greg Borenstein. Researcher at MIT Media Lab, Playful Systems.

Match

Been playing around with making quick two-panel comics out of things from my sketchbook. Trying to find a basic kernel of juxtaposition or twist of meaning. Never have a plan for which drawings I’ll combine or what the captions will be when I draw them.

Match

Been playing around with making quick two-panel comics out of things from my sketchbook. Trying to find a basic kernel of juxtaposition or twist of meaning. Never have a plan for which drawings I’ll combine or what the captions will be when I draw them.

Younger Days

Been experimenting with making short comics out of some of my sketchbook drawings.

Younger Days

Been experimenting with making short comics out of some of my sketchbook drawings.

Three Kings

fakegames:

Folk horror blog The Ghost in the Machine includes a category called The Most Dangerous Game which catalogues “games which you really shouldn’t play”. These take the form of detailed instructions for activities that are partway between games and rituals that circulate through folk culture. One…

fakegames:

"Kosho is a game or martial art conceived by Patrick McGoohan for the highly admired 1967 television series The Prisoner. The game of Kosho is played on two trampolines set on either side of a four-foot-by-eight-foot tank of water and bordered on two sides by a wall with an angled ledge and hand-rail. Two helmeted opponents each wear a boxing glove on their left hand and a lighter padded glove on their right, and while moving freely in three dimensions attempt to knock, push or throw each other into the tank.”

— From this youtube page

The Prisoner is like a Borgesian library: full of infinite oddities.

electricbreeze:

overzealousgirl:

Researchers in the US are developing ‘organs-on-a-chip’ - an entire electronic set of human organs that can take the guesswork, and animals, out of drug testing.

“We are learning more and more that mice and rats don’t predict humans. The shortcomings of animal testing are becoming clear.”

Source.

"The technology uses a series of small, plastic chips that have tiny artificial channels, vessels and flexible membranes built into them and lined with human cells so they can effectively mimic the functions of a number of human organs such as a lung, gut, liver and kidney"


Saw a scientist who works on the heart component of this project speak at MIT last year. It’s intriguing stuff.

electricbreeze:

overzealousgirl:

Researchers in the US are developing ‘organs-on-a-chip’ - an entire electronic set of human organs that can take the guesswork, and animals, out of drug testing.

“We are learning more and more that mice and rats don’t predict humans. The shortcomings of animal testing are becoming clear.”

Source.


"The technology uses a series of small, plastic chips that have tiny artificial channels, vessels and flexible membranes built into them and lined with human cells so they can effectively mimic the functions of a number of human organs such as a lung, gut, liver and kidney"

Saw a scientist who works on the heart component of this project speak at MIT last year. It’s intriguing stuff.

(via 2087)

"The Thing, also known as the Great Seal bug, was one of the first covert listening devices (or "bugs") to use passive techniques to transmit an audio signal. Because it was passive, being energized and activated by electromagnetic energy from an outside source, it is considered a predecessor of RFID technology."

 (via Thing (listening device) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
Tiny flying robots are being built to pollinate crops instead of real bees (via Tiny flying robots are being built to pollinate crops instead of real bees | VentureBeat | Science | by Dina Spector, Business Insider)

zerostatereflex:

7 Finger Robot

"The device, worn around one’s wrist, works essentially like two extra fingers adjacent to the pinky and thumb. The robot, which the researchers have dubbed "supernumerary robotic fingers," or "SR fingers," consists of actuators linked together to exert forces as strong as those of human fingers during a grasping motion."

Robot tech, YES.

(via 2087)

fakegames:

I mainly post fake tabletop games and sports rather than video games. Fiction that describes tabletop games usually focuses on imagining game mechanics, inter-player dynamics, and other issues of interest to game designers. Descriptions of video games, on the other hand, typically take the form of in-game narrative. Fiction writers take video games as imaginary worlds that chiefly serve as settings for stories. And they often function as a convenient frame around fantastical elements in a story that is otherwise striving for psychological/science fictional/or other forms of realism.

That said, I’m posting this trailer for the 1993 b-movie Arcade because it has awesomely terrible early 90s game graphics and a somehow inevitable appearance by John de Lancie (Star Trek’s Q), but also because it touches on some of the core fantasies around “immersion” that have re-emerged recently with the rise of the Oculus Rift (and technologically-driven hyper-realist AAA game styles more generally). This fantasy of a dissolving barrier between the game and real worlds manifests in a lot of today’s rhetoric around game (and other computer) interfaces. Beyond the Oculus Rift and the new rise of VR, this fantasy is widespread in the technology industry at the moment from Microsoft’s rhetoric of Natural User Interface (or “NUI”, their paradigm for how to use the Kinect) to the discourse around touch interfaces, voice interfaces like Siri, and even Google’s modifications to its search query parsing.

This fantasy of immersion is different from the typical fictional use of game worlds as simply story settings. Fantasies of immersion propose that the purpose of game design is to place you into a fictional context so thoroughly that it achieves some kind of parity with reality. This is the opposite of the framework that says that game design is about the construction of obstacles for the player — the “Golf is a good walk ruined” school.

Ironically, the cliches of storytelling mean that it’s typical for movies like Arcade to start with the fantasy of immersion (all the promise of the shiny graphics, head-mounted displays, and power gloves) and then, as the Evil Computer comes alive and menaces the characters, to evolve into something that looks a lot more like a real game: a series of obstacles placed between a player and a goal, requiring increasing skill and imposing increasing stakes, with story as the flimsiest armature holding up a ingenious mechanical contraption.

(Source: youtube.com)